Articles

University of Arkansas Little Rock - Mathematics

University of Arkansas Little Rock - Mathematics


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

University of Arkansas Little Rock - Mathematics

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock, located in the state’s capital city, offers a comprehensive academic experience at the baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels innovative research opportunities a quality faculty educated from around the world and a rich student life experience with athletics, housing, study abroad, Greek life and service learning.

Student success is the university’s top priority for all students who range from recent high school graduates to mid-life adults and senior citizens. As the most diverse university in the state, UA Little Rock fulfills one of the state’s greatest needs by increasing the number of college graduates in Arkansas. Our students include traditional residential students, part-time students, and graduate and professional degree seekers. The caring faculty and staff work closely with students to provide career preparation and research opportunities in world-class facilities and programs like the Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences and MidSOUTH, the community service and social work center of UA Little Rock.

UA Little Rock faculty possess a wide range of expertise in a host of academic disciplines exposing students to current research techniques and cutting-edge technology. Our faculty have imbued the university with multi-million dollar grants to develop advances in healthcare and contribute to the latest developments in cybersecurity. Students are at the forefront of these efforts through the university’s Signature Experience program where they actively engage in research and community service opportunities under the direction of experienced faculty.

The university is widely recognized for its involvement in public issues such as race and ethnicity, criminal justice and pre-kindergarten to 12th-grade education. UA Little Rock’s students, faculty, and staff are active in service-learning activities around the state through partnerships with trusted institutions such as the University District Partnership, Clinton School of Public Service, and Children International.


President Donald R. Bobbitt

Dr. Donald R. Bobbitt began his term as president on November 1, 2011. Previously, he served as provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Texas at Arlington, from 2008-11.

After earning a doctorate in chemistry from Iowa State University in 1985, Bobbitt became an assistant professor in the department of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Among his many honors are the University of Arkansas Alumni Association Award in Teaching and the Fulbright College Master Teacher Award.

For five years, he was a recipient of the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Teacher-Scholar Fellowship, from 1988-93. His research has been supported by a number of national corporations and organizations — including the R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

He is also the author or co-author of 56 refereed publications and has on several occasions been an invited speaker at meetings of the American Chemical Association. In 2003, he was named Dean of the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas.


The Cammack Campus

The President’s Residence

The University of Arkansas System administration office and president’s home are located on a beautiful, 40-acre tract of land on North University Avenue in Little Rock. Donated to the university in 1957 by the late Kate Cammack to be used for educational and cultural programs, the “Cammack Campus” was established when the president’s home was constructed in 1995. The administration building was completed in 1997.

The 5,000-square-foot Jeffersonian style home serves as both the president’s residence and a site for university functions. The administration building is located on the south end of the property and houses the office of the president and the UA System administrative staff. The president’s home and office are strategically located in the state capitol, providing a centralized location among the UA System campuses and units.


Contents

Early developments Edit

The University of Arkansas was founded in 1871 on the site of a hilltop farm that overlooked the Ozark Mountains, giving it the nickname "The Hill". [18]

The university was established under the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act of 1862. The university's founding also satisfied the provision in the Arkansas Constitution of 1868 that the General Assembly was to "establish and maintain a State University." [19]

Bids from state towns and counties determined the university's location. The citizens of Fayetteville and Washington County. [19] pledged $130,000 toward securing the university, a sum that proved to be more than other offers. This was in response to the competition created by the Arkansas General Assembly's Organic Act of 1871, providing for the "location, organization and maintenance of the Arkansas Industrial University with a normal department [i.e., teacher education] therein." Classes started on January 22, 1872.

Notable landmarks Edit

Completed in 1875, Old Main, a two-towered brick building designed in the Second Empire style, was the primary instructional and administrative building. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its design was based on the plans for the main academic building at the University of Illinois, which has since been demolished. [20] However, the clock and bell towers were switched at Arkansas. The northern taller tower is the bell tower, and the southern shorter tower is the clock tower. One legend for the tower switch is that the taller tower was put to the north as a reminder of the Union victory during the Civil War. [20] A second legend is that the contractor accidentally swapped the tower drawings after having had too much to drink. Although the southern tower was designed with clock faces, it did not hold a working clock until October 2005. The bell tower has always had some type of chime, initially a bell that was rung on the hour by student volunteers. Electronic chimes were installed in 1959.

In addition to the regular chimes of the clock, the university's Alma Mater plays at 5 pm every day. [20] Old Main housed many of the earliest classes at the university, and has served as the offices of every college within the university during its history. Today, in addition to hosting classes, it contains the restored Giffels Auditorium and historic displays, as well as the administrative offices of the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. [19]

The lawn at Old Main serves as an arboretum, with many of the trees native to the state of Arkansas found on the lawn. Sitting at the edge of the lawn is Spoofer's Stone, a place for couples to meet and pass notes. Students play soccer, cricket and touch football on the lawn's open green. [20]

Beginning with the class of 1876, the names of students at University of Arkansas are inscribed in "Senior Walk" and wind across campus for more than four miles. [14] The sidewalk is one of a kind nationally. [19] More recently, the names of all the recipients of honorary degrees were also added, including such notables as J. Edgar Hoover, Queen Noor, President Bill Clinton, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. [20]

One of the more unusual structures at Arkansas is the Chi Omega Greek Theatre, a gift to the school by the sorority's national headquarters. It marked the first time in the history of Greek letter social organizations that a national sorority had presented a memorial of its foundation to the institution where it was founded. [20] Chi Omega was organized on April 5, 1895, at the University of Arkansas and is the mother (Psi) chapter of the national organization. The theater has been used for commencements, convocations, concerts, dramas and pep rallies. The largest crowd ever assembled there – upwards of 6,000, according to professor Walter J. Lemke – was for a concert by the Army Air Corps Band during World War II. From 1934 to 1991, the space under the stage was used for a rifle range by the Army ROTC. [20]

African American history and African studies program Edit

The first African American student, James McGahee, attended the University of Arkansas in 1872, following the university’s opening in 1871 during the Reconstruction era, to “prepare for the ministry of the Episcopal Church”. He is noted as having a grade average deemed excellent. Alongside McGahee, two other African American men, Mark W. Alexander and Isom Washington, are noted as having attended Arkansas Industrial College, however no record of their enrollment has been found. Following the end of Reconstruction, the racial dynamic shifted at the university and it is unknown if McGahee was able to continue his education following 1873. [21] [22]

Former state senator and U.S. congressman John N. Tillman served as president of the University of Arkansas from 1905 to 1912. In the Arkansas State Senate he proposed the Separate Coach Law of 1891, a Jim Crow law to segregate African American passengers. The bill became law and was enforced for many decades. [23]

The University of Arkansas admitted Silas Herbert Hunt of Texarkana, an African American veteran of World War II to the university's School of Law in 1948. Hunt's enrollment was regarded as the first successful school integration below the Mason–Dixon line of that era. [24] While Hunt was admitted into the University, his attendance was not met without controversy. With extremely mixed reviews stating that it was both a good and bad idea for a black student to attend the university. [25] African American students were permitted to attend the University, under the condition that they enroll as graduate or law students, and be taught in segregated classes. Unfortunately, Silas Hunt was only able to complete one year of education. In April 1949, Hunt was admitted to the VA hospital, where he later died of tuberculosis, aggravated by injuries he had sustained in the war. [26] [27]

Roy Wilkins, administrator of the NAACP, wrote in 1950 that Arkansas was the "very first of the Southern states to accept the new trend without fighting a delaying action or attempting to. limit, if not nullify, bare compliance." A large part of Hunt’s success was due to three advantages found in Arkansas: there were no laws on the books specifically prohibiting mixed education in the state, a supreme court ruling that stated law students be allowed to study in the state they intended to practice, and the means for admitting African American Student to address legal education being seen as affordable and equitable. [27] [28]

In the fall of 1948 changes were made to the University’s segregation policy, which allowed for the admittance of African American students into regular classes. The first to follow Hunt was a student by the name of Jackie L. Shropshire, who would later go on to become the University’s first black graduate in 1951. Several African American students followed in his footsteps, attending various graduate programs at the University. As a result, race relations at the University of Arkansas greatly improved. Arkansas was freely admitting African American students as early as 1957, while many southern states still prohibited black students from attending all white universities. The events in Little Rock at this time did some damage to race relations at the University that would not be fixed for some time. [27]

In 1969, the University created the Black Studies Advisory Committee to facilitate the creation of a Black Studies program, which began in the fall semester of 1968 with 19 courses offered.

In 1990 Gordon Daniel Morgan, a professor of sociology at the university and an alumnus of its graduate school, wrote The Edge of Campus: A Journal of the Black Experience at the University of Arkansas with his wife Izola.

In 2004, the University provided resources to help support the program, establishing the John White Scholarship, Sankofa Registered Student Organization, and Ghana study abroad tour. In 2008, The Black Studies program was renamed the African and African American Studies (AAST) program and expanded its course offerings and student enrollment. In 2014, the program moved to a new space in Memorial Hall and was added to the University Core. A year later, an online minor and graduate certificate in African and African American Studies was established. The University hosted its first annual AAST Graduate Fellows search symposium in 2016 and established the Dr. Roy S. Bryce-Laporte scholarship later in 2018. [29] In 2019, the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees voted to rename halls B and C of the Northwest Quad in honor of Dr. Gordon Morgan and Dr. Margaret Clark, respectively. [30] The University has also hosted guest lectures by Dr. Aldon D. Morris, Dr. Carol Anderson, and Nikole Hannah-Jones related to African and African American studies. [29] [31]

Notable people in African and African American history at the University Edit

  • Dr. Gordon Daniel Morgan – An alumnus and one of the first Black professors at the University of Arkansas, and was hired to teach sociology [30]
  • Dr. Margaret Clark – One of the first Black professors at the University of Arkansas, and was hired to teach world languages [30]
  • Dr. Gerald Jordan – attended the University of Arkansas School of Journalism and Media, and is the University’s current Faculty and Athletics Representative to NCAA and SEC [32]
  • Dr. Caree Banton, Dr. Brandon Jackson, Dr. Benjamin Fagan, Dr. Valandra – 1 st Cohort of Joint-Appointed faculty to AAST program [29][33]
  • Directors of African and African American Studies Program [29]
    • 2004 – 2012 Dr. Charles Robinson
    • 2012 – 2015 Dr. Calvin White
    • 2015 – 2017 (interim) Dr. Pearl Dowe and Dr. Yvette Murphy-Erby
    • 2017 – 2020 Dr. Valandra
    • 2020 – Current Dr. Caree Banton [34]

    Research Edit

    Vitamin E was co-discovered by UA Agricultural Chemistry Professor Barnett Sure (1920–51). Sure, along with fellow professor Marinus C. Kik (1927–67) made major advances in nutrition science during their long tenures at the University of Arkansas. Sure co-discovered vitamin E, and extended knowledge of how vitamin E, amino acids and B-vitamins function on reproduction and lactation. Kik developed the process for parboiling rice (a major agricultural crop in the state) to increase retention of vitamins and shorten cooking time. [19] He documented benefits of adding fish and chicken to rice and grain diets to provide adequate protein for a growing world population. Sure and Kik were Agricultural Experiment Station scientists and professors in the UA Department of Agricultural Chemistry, which merged in 1964 with Home Economics, now the School of Human Environmental Sciences. [20]

    In the 1920s, Loy Barton, an engineering graduate student at the University of Arkansas, set forth the principle of high-level Class B plate modulation for radio transmission and developed the technology that allowed small- and medium-size AM radio stations to flourish across the United States. Barnett later joined RCA and continued research on broadcast technology into the 1960s. [19]

    The most widely implemented automated mail sorting equipment in the world–the Wide Area Bar Code Reader–was developed by the University of Arkansas College of Engineering. A $50,000 grant from the United States Postal Service (USPS) to Professors Dwight F. Mix and J.E. Bass in 1989 began the research and development effort. [20] By 1999, more than 15,000 University of Arkansas bar code readers were located in every major USPS facility, increasing the efficiency of processing 20 billion pieces of mail a year at a savings of $200 million. This R&D effort has spawned four additional electronic systems to help the USPS "read the mail." [19]

    During the 1980s, Professors Allen Hermann and Zhengzhi Sheng of the Department of Physics were in the vanguard of research in superconductivity: the phenomenon whereby Direct Current (DC) electricity, once started, can flow essentially forever. [20] The Thallium-based material they discovered at Arkansas held the world's record for high temperature, 125K, for five years (1988–93) and drew international attention to the university. Their work led to numerous patents and a manufacturing agreement, as well as further advances in high-density electronics. [20]

    University of Arkansas plant pathologists George Templeton, Roy Smith (USDA), David TeBeest and graduate student Jim Daniels conducted research in the early 1970s that led to COLLEGO, the first biological herbicide for weed control in a field crop. Other UA scientists and students worked on the project that resulted in EPA registration of COLLEGO by Upjohn in 1982 for control of northern jointvetch in rice and soybeans. The work provided a model used worldwide to develop biological herbicides. Leadership in this area helped the U of A obtain grants from the USDA and others for construction of the Rosen Center for Alternative Pest Control. [20]

    Academic rankings
    National
    ARWU [35] 138–155
    Forbes [36] 271
    THE/WSJ [37] 401–500
    U.S. News & World Report [38] 160
    Washington Monthly [39] 295
    Global
    ARWU [40] 501–600
    QS [41] 801–1000
    THE [42] 601–800
    U.S. News & World Report [43] 671

    The University of Arkansas offers more than 200 programs of study leading to bachelors, masters, doctoral, and law degrees. [44] Academic programs are organized into numerous departments and schools based out of the ten primary colleges on the main campus. [45] The following degree-granting academic divisions are located on the Fayetteville campus:

    College/school founding [20]
    College/school Year founded
    Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences 1905
    College of Engineering 1912
    College of Education & Health Professions 1912
    J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences 1912
    School of Law 1924
    Sam M. Walton College of Business 1926
    Graduate School and International Education 1927
    Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design 1974

    Other divisions Edit

    The Honors College and Global Campus do not award degrees but provide degree programs with honors coursework and distance education opportunities, respectively, for the Fayetteville campus:


    Academic and Scholarly Growth

    Although the university established a medical college at Little Rock during the late 19th century, its real growth in academic programs on the Fayetteville campus didn't occur until the early 20th century.

    A college of agriculture was created in 1905. Soon after, university officials approved a broader restructuring to create the colleges of engineering, education, and arts and science.

    All of these subjects had been taught from the beginning as part of the university's classical education, but growth in the student population and addition of faculty allowed deeper and broader investigation of these fields of study and the subsequent creation of colleges and schools.

    By the mid-20th century, the university also added a college of business administration, a school of law and a nascent graduate school to develop programs leading to master's and doctoral degrees. Just after World War II, a program in architecture was created that led to establishment of a school of architecture.

    Those colleges and schools are our primary degree-granting divisions of the university. But like a quilt overlaying them, three other academic divisions — a school of continuing education, the university libraries and an honors college — give support to each of the degree-granting divisions.

    With the academic growth came a commitment to deeper research and scholarly activity. As the research grew, so did the draw of graduate students and federal grants from the National Science Foundation and more recently the National Institutes of Health.

    In 2011, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching added the University of Arkansas to its top level of research institutions, putting it among the top 2 percent based on the number of doctoral degrees granted, the annual research expenditures and our scholarly productivity.

    Did you know.

    • Bill and Hillary Clinton started their careers as faculty members of the School of Law in the 1970s and were married in Fayetteville.
    • The university’s program in creative writing has produced some of the top writers in the nation, including Ellen Gilchrist, a National Book Award winner, and C.D. Wright, whose Arkansas-inspired poetry earned her a MacArthur Fellowship, the so-called “Genius Grant.”
    • • In 2003, the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation gave $300 million to the university, the largest single gift to an American institution of higher education at the time. That gift has transformed the university, creating an Honors College and endowing the Graduate School.

    University of Arkansas Honors College Selects 2017 Class of Fellows

    FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. &mdash The University of Arkansas Honors College has selected 85 exceptional high school students to be the 2017 class of Honors College Fellows. More than 80 percent of them are recent graduates of Arkansas high schools, and nearly 20 percent are the first in their family to attend college.

    &ldquoThis year&rsquos group of new fellows boasts an average grade point average of 4.19 and an average composite ACT score of 34.06,&rdquo said Noah Pittman, assistant dean of the Honors College. &ldquoSuch high-performing students are recruited by top universities all across the country, and awards such as the Honors College Fellowship help us compete with these schools to keep Arkansas students of this caliber in state. Given their intellectual prowess and passion for service we are confident they will excel both on campus and in the wider community.&rdquo

    The members of this distinguished class are pursuing a wide range of academic interests, from physics and audio engineering to music, political science and architecture. Six of the fellows were named to the Arkansas Times All-Stars Team: Avery Elliott and Jared Gilliam from Cabot Carson Molder from Mabelvale Megan Olsen from Fayetteville Grant Robinson from Searcy and Preston Stone from Benton. Many of the fellows have already made strides in the world of higher academics. Olsen, for example, is the co-author of a paper on fractal self-assembly, which was published in the proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming.

    The Honors College fellowship of $70,000 largely covers tuition, registration, books, and room and board over four years, granting these students the freedom to pursue original research, study abroad, service learning and other academic interests. The fellowship funds can also be combined with other scholarships and grants, such as the more than $1 million in study abroad and research grants that the Honors College awards to students each year.

    The Honors College Fellowships were made possible by a portion of the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation&rsquos $300 million gift to the university in 2002. The fellowship application process is rigorous. Students must score at least a 32 on the ACT and have a minimum 3.8 grade point average to apply, and Honors College administrators and faculty review each student application for evidence of intellectual curiosity, leadership potential and community involvement. The selection process also involves a writing test and campus interview for finalists in early March.

    Including the 2017 recipients, a total of 1,180 students have benefited from the Honors College Fellowship program. Recent fellows include Truman Scholars, Goldwater Scholars and an Olympic pole vaulter. Many alumni are pursuing higher degrees at top schools such as the California Institute of Technology and Tufts University School of Medicine.

    The University of Arkansas Honors College Fellows Class of 2021, with their high school and hometown:

    • Michael Achterberg, County Line High School, Cecil
    • Jessi Amason, Arkansas School for Math and Science, Benton
    • Nathan Barker, Southside High School, Fort Smith
    • Stephanie Beitle, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Shiloh Bemis, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • William Blasingame, Liberty High School, Plano, Texas
    • Gianna Busch, Bishop Kelley High School, Tulsa, Oklahoma
    • Caroline Campbell, Bryant High School, Benton
    • Davis Campbell, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Lynae Carlson, Olathe South High School, Olathe, Kansas
    • Winson Chee, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • James Chesshir, Little Rock Christian Academy, Little Rock
    • Adam Coffman, Olathe North High School, Overland Park, Kansas
    • Cara Coffman, George Ranch High School, Sugar Land, Texas
    • Brant Collins, Russellville High School, Russellville
    • Ethan Collins, Har Ber High School, Springdale
    • Jeremy Collins, Russellville High School, Russellville
    • Caroline Crawford, Stratford High School, Houston, Texas
    • Sydney Darling, Bentonville High School, Centerton
    • Robert Davidson, Little Rock Central, Roland
    • Denver Eagar, Greenwood High School, Booneville
    • Amy Eggers, Maumelle High School, Maumelle
    • Avery Elliott, Cabot High School, Cabot
    • Karleigh Ferrell, Concord High School, Concord
    • Michael Fredricks, Cabot High School, Cabot
    • Tyler Gerth, Bartlesville High School, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
    • Jared Gilliam, Cabot High School, Cabot
    • Heather Glenn, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Jackson Gregory, Arkansas School for Math & Science, Hot Springs
    • Josephine Hall, Huntingtown High School, Prince Frederick, Maryland
    • Andrew He, Little Rock Central, Little Rock
    • Amy Hendricks, Glen Rose High School, Malvern
    • Kayla Ho, Van Buren High School, Van Buren
    • William Hoisington, Bentonville High School, Rogers
    • Hannah Hulbert, Haas Hall Academy, Siloam Springs
    • Jacob Huneycutt, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Rachael Koehler, Saxony Lutheran High School, Jackson, Missouri
    • Sarah Komar, Park Hill South High School, Kansas City, Missouri
    • Abigail Kotar, Shawnee Mission East High School, Prairie Village, Kansas
    • Lillian Larson, Bentonville High School, Bentonville
    • Grayson Lee, Rogers High School, Rogers
    • Ryan Leggitt, Greenbrier High School, Greenbrier
    • John Magness, Southside High School, Fort Smith
    • Huy Mai, Southside High School, Fort Smith
    • Kara Maurer, Bryant High School, Bryant
    • Malachi Maurice, Elkins High School, Fayetteville
    • Rachel McCann, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Jett McCullough, Salem High School, Salem
    • Timothy McMullen, Union High School, Tulsa, Oklahoma
    • Katherine McTigrit, Star City High School, Star City
    • Jack Meullenet, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Justin Mitchell, Haas Hall Academy, Rogers
    • Carson Molder, Bryant High School, Mabelvale
    • Jesse Morrison, Little Rock Central, Roland
    • Taylor Mosley, Arkansas School for Math & Science, Conway
    • Christopher Nosari, Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home
    • Sylvia Nupp, Russellville High School, Russellville
    • Meagan Olsen, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Olivia Overton, Pulaski Academy, Alexander
    • Gustavo Perez, Horatio High School, De Queen
    • Lawson Porter, Edward Marcus High School, Flower Mound, Texas
    • Jacob Purifoy, Ashdown High School, Ashdown
    • Samuel Raney, Catholic High School, Little Rock
    • Madeline Richards, Bentonville High School, Rogers
    • Emily Richey, Paris High School, Paris
    • Grant Robinson, Searcy High School, Searcy
    • Megan Rodgers, Siloam Springs High School, Siloam Springs
    • Clay Schuler, Episcopal Collegiate School, Little Rock
    • Shiva Shanmuganathan, Bentonville High School, Bentonville
    • John Shelnutt, Episcopal Collegiate School, Little Rock
    • Logan Siems, Little Rock Central, Scott
    • Landon Skouras, Brinkley High School, Brinkley
    • Aidan Smith, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Tyler Stamps, Rogers High School, Rogers
    • Carl Stevens, Fayetteville High School, Fayetteville
    • Preston Stone, Benton High School, Benton
    • Sara Swank, Plano Senior High School, Plano, Texas
    • Brittany Tian, Little Rock Central, Little Rock
    • Hayden Townsend, Bentonville High School, Bentonville
    • Brandon Tran, Nettleton High School, Jonesboro
    • John Vogler, Russellville High School, Russellville
    • Daniel Voss, Rockwood Summit High School, Fenton, Missouri
    • Brandon Ward, Bentonville High School, Centerton
    • Logan Watts, Arkansas School for Math & Science, Little Rock
    • Ayman Yousef, Little Rock Central, Little Rock

    About the Honors College: The University of Arkansas Honors College was established in 2002 and unites the university&rsquos top undergraduate students and professors in a learning environment characterized by discovery, creativity and service. Each year the Honors College awards up to 90 freshman fellowships that provide $70,000 over four years, and more than $1 million in undergraduate research and study abroad grants. The Honors College is nationally recognized for the high caliber of students it admits and graduates. Honors students enjoy small, in-depth classes, and programs are offered in all disciplines, tailored to students&rsquo academic interests, with interdisciplinary collaborations encouraged. Fifty percent of Honors College graduates have studied abroad &ndash three times the national average &ndash and one hundred percent of Honors College graduates have engaged in mentored research.


    REGISTER NOW

    Summer II and Fall registration is open!

    University of Arkansas - Pulaski Technical College is YOUR community's technical college.

    To meet our mission, we offer more than 80 programs, degrees, and certificates to provide access to high-quality education that promotes student learning and enables individuals to develop to their fullest potential.

    IMPORTANT DATES

    Summer II 2021

    July 1-12 - Charge books using financial aid, 5 Week Summer II
    July 6 - Classes begin, 5 Week Summer II
    July 7 - Last day to register, 5 Week Summer II
    July 7 - Payment deadline, 5 Week Summer II

    Aug. 16 - Sept. 3 - Charge books using financial aid
    Aug. 23 - Classes begin, 16 Week and 8 Week I
    Oct. 18 - Classes begin, 8 Week II
    Aug. 27 - Last day to register
    Aug. 29 - Payment deadline


    University of Arkansas Honors College Selects 2018 Class of Fellows

    FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. &mdash The University of Arkansas Honors College has selected 88 exceptional high school students, 79 of them Arkansans, to receive prestigious Honors College Fellowships. The group boasts an average grade point average of 4.19 and an average composite ACT score of 33.83, making them one of the most competitive groups of Honors College Fellows to date.

    The Honors College fellowship of $70,000 largely covers tuition, registration, books, and room and board over four years, granting these students the freedom to pursue original research, study abroad, service learning and other academic interests. The fellowship funds can also be combined with other scholarships and grants, such as the more than $1 million in study abroad and research grants that the Honors College awards to students each year.

    The members of this distinguished class plan to pursue a diverse range of subjects, from chemistry and biomedical engineering to global marketing, social work and architecture.

    These new fellows have already accrued a variety of honors during their early years. Benjamin Allen of Bella Vista, for instance, was named to the Arkansas Times All-Stars Team for his extensive work in computer science and coding. Additionally, 25 members of the entering class of fellows were named National Merit Finalists.

    Many of the Honors College fellows have also contributed to their local communities. Sara Ottinger of Texarkana wrote a doctor-approved book on nutrition and eating disorders in order to educate her peers. Many of the fellows have led clubs and participated in student government in their respective high schools, and several have held leadership positions at Boys State, Girls State and Arkansas Governor&rsquos School.

    &ldquoThirty percent of these recipients are the first in their family to attend college, and the cohort spans students from all corners of Arkansas&rdquo said Noah Pittman, assistant dean of the Honors College. &ldquoThese students are recruited by top colleges and universities throughout the country, and awards such as the Honors College Fellowship allow us to attract Arkansas students of this caliber and keep them in state. Based on their academic accomplishments and their commitment to service, we are confident they will excel as leaders both on campus and throughout the community.&rdquo

    The Honors College Fellowships were made possible by a portion of the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation&rsquos $300 million gift to the university in 2002.

    The fellowship application process is rigorous. Students must score at least a 32 on the ACT and have a minimum 3.8 grade point average to apply, and Honors College administrators and faculty review each student application for evidence of intellectual curiosity, leadership potential and community involvement. The selection process also involves a writing test and campus interview for finalists in early March.

    Including the 2018 recipients, a total of 1,268 students have benefited from the Honors College Fellowship program. Recent fellows include Truman Scholars, Goldwater Scholars, a Schwarzman Scholar and an Olympic pole vaulter. Many alumni are pursuing higher degrees at top schools such as Harvard Law School, Johns Hopkins, Cambridge University, the California Institute of Technology and Tufts University School of Medicine.

    The following are the members of the University of Arkansas Honors College Fellows Class of 2022, with their high schools and hometowns:


    Contents

    The university features more than 100 undergraduate degrees [11] and 60 graduate degrees, [12] including graduate certificates, master's degrees, and doctorates, through both traditional and online courses. [13] Students attend classes in one of the university's three new colleges and a law school: [14]

    • College of Business, Health, and Human Services [15]
    • College of Humanities, Arts, Social Sciences, and Education [16]
    • Donaghey College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics [17][18]

    The student life at UA Little Rock is typical of public universities in the United States. It is characterized by student-run organizations and affiliation groups that support social, academic, athletic and religious activities and interests. Some of the services offered by the UA Little Rock Office of Campus Life are intramural sports and fitness programs, diversity programs, leadership development, peer tutoring, student government association, student support programs including groups for non-traditional and first generation students, a student-run newspaper, and fraternity and sorority life. The proximity of the UA Little Rock campus to downtown Little Rock enables students to take advantage of a wide array of recreational, entertainment, educational, internship and employment opportunities that are not available anywhere else in Arkansas. [19]

    Campus living Edit

    UA Little Rock provides a variety of on-campus living options for students ranging from traditional resident rooms to multiple bedroom apartments. The university has four residence halls on the eastern side of the campus and the University Village Apartment Complex [20] on the southern side of campus. Six learning communities focusing on criminal justice, arts and culture, majors and careers, future business innovators, nursing careers, and STEM are available to students.

    Athletics Edit

    UA Little Rock's 14 athletic teams are known as the Little Rock Trojans, with almost all teams participating in the Sun Belt Conference. Little Rock is one of two Sun Belt members that do not sponsor football (UT Arlington being the other) UA Little Rock last fielded a football team in 1955 when it was known as Little Rock Junior College. Little Rock's main athletic offices are located in the Jack Stephens Center. UA Little Rock offers the following sports:

    • Baseball
    • Men's and Women's Basketball
    • Men's and Women's Golf
    • Women's Volleyball
    • Women's Soccer
    • Women's Swimming/Diving
    • Men's and Women's Cross Country
    • Men's and Women's Track and Field (Indoor and Outdoor)
    • Men's wrestling

    Two Little Rock teams that do not compete in the Sun Belt are the women's swimming and diving team (Missouri Valley Conference) and wrestling (Pac-12 Conference), neither of which the Sun Belt sponsors. Wrestling is the school's newest sport, starting in 2019 and is the first Division I program in Arkansas.

    On July 1, 2014, the UA Little Rock Collections and Archives division was created. The division encompasses:

    • Ottenheimer Library
    • Center for Arkansas History and Culture
    • Sequoyah National Research Center

    The Japanese School of Little Rock (リトルロック日本語補習校 Ritoru Rokku Nihongo Hoshūkō), a weekend Japanese education program, holds its classes at the University Plaza. [21]


    Watch the video: University of Arkansas at Little Rock Review. Do Not Go There Before You Watch This Video! (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Daijon

    What an entertaining message

  2. Kigazragore

    Agree, a useful idea

  3. Tele

    On mine the theme is rather interesting. I suggest you it to discuss here or in PM.



Write a message